Harmful Effects Of Smoking & Pollution On Your Skin/Hair

Harmful Effects Of Smoking & Pollution On Your Skin/Hair

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Reading Time: 4 minutes

The detrimental effects of pollution overexposure and smoking are widespread and many. Effects on the skin are visible very early. Skin dryness, premature aging, rashes, deep pigmentation, acne and eczema can be seen within a few days of overexposure to pollution. The effect on hair is a completely different story as the change is gradual.

Along with overexposure to pollution, smoking also has significant on skin and hair both from in and outside the body. Both the factors affect the genetics of a person and thus change the structure and dense of hair and the age of skin.

Breathing nasty urban pollution and smoke puffs does more than clogging up lungs; it actually messes with genes also. We inherit our genes from our parents and later in life the genes can be changed by chemical alterations of the DNA. Both the environmental pollution and smoking have more than thousand of chemicals and few of these alter the gene structure.

It is common knowledge that our skin and hair pattern are related to our genes. Suppose your father or grandfather was bald, then there are high chances of you going bald as well. This can happen in you teens, mid age or at later stages. Pollution overexposure and smoking alter the gene structure thus resulting in early baldness and skin aging. Few people also complain about early greying of hair due to these factors.

Hence it is told that “You May Have Grandma’s Genes, But Not Her Environment”. The environment and habits were much cleaner and safer during our grandma days; the same cannot hold true for today.

Few lifestyle changes that would include mandatory leaving of smoking can bring in significant changes to hair and skin texture.

► Consume at least five types of vegetables and fruits everyday
► Drink up to 4 to 5 litres of normal water
► Apply skincare creams and sunscreen generously

Last but not the least would plant few plants in your vicinity and kick that cigarette for good health and clean environment.

The detrimental effects of pollution overexposure and smoking are widespread and many. Effects on the skin are visible very early. Skin dryness, premature aging, rashes, deep pigmentation, acne and eczema can be seen within a few days of overexposure to pollution. The effect on hair is a completely different story as the change is gradual.

Along with overexposure to pollution, smoking also has significant on skin and hair both from in and outside the body. Both the factors affect the genetics of a person and thus change the structure and dense of hair and the age of skin.

Breathing nasty urban pollution and smoke puffs does more than clogging up lungs; it actually messes with genes also. We inherit our genes from our parents and later in life the genes can be changed by chemical alterations of the DNA. Both the environmental pollution and smoking have more than thousand of chemicals and few of these alter the gene structure.

It is common knowledge that our skin and hair pattern are related to our genes. Suppose your father or grandfather was bald, then there are high chances of you going bald as well. This can happen in you teens, mid age or at later stages. Pollution overexposure and smoking alter the gene structure thus resulting in early baldness and skin aging. Few people also complain about early greying of hair due to these factors.

Hence it is told that “You May Have Grandma’s Genes, But Not Her Environment”. The environment and habits were much cleaner and safer during our grandma days; the same cannot hold true for today.

Few lifestyle changes that would include mandatory leaving of smoking can bring in significant changes to hair and skin texture.

► Consume at least five types of vegetables and fruits everyday
► Drink up to 4 to 5 litres of normal water
► Apply skincare creams and sunscreen generously

Last but not the least would plant few plants in your vicinity and kick that cigarette for good health and clean environment.

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About The Author

Minu Manisha Babel

Minu Manisha Babel

An MBA by chance, a trainer by passion, a psychologist by interest and a voracious reader by parentage. I enjoy traveling, public speaking, exploring and writing on topics relevant to our health and well-being.


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